N.Y. terminal offers bioheat to Northeast

By | February 01, 2005
Chilly winter temperatures keep consumers cranking up the thermostats at home, and likewise using up more heating oil. Now, consumers in the Northeast have the option of using an environmentally friendly heating fuel, thanks to Fred M. Schildwachter & Sons.

The company, a century-old family-owned retail and wholesale fuel oil and diesel terminal in Bronx, N.Y., began offering BioFuel, a home heating oil product consisting of 20 percent soybean oil and 80 percent low-sulfur heating oil. David J. Schildwachter, a company principal, told Biodiesel Magazine the American JOBS Creation Act of 2004 will give his company tax incentives that lower the price of BioFuel, making it the same price as regular heating oil. The JOBS Bill went into effect Jan. 1.

"We're selling biofuels at heating oil price," Schildwachter said. "We think it's a win-win for the customer because it also helps us reduce our dependence on foreign oil. It's a drop in a bucket, but it's a step in the right direction."

Schildwachter said the company decided to offer the product because, in his own words, "it's a premium product. It' burns cleaner, there's no sulfur in soybeans, the combustion is clear and there's less particulate matter." Some argue that BioFuel costs more and has a lower heating value. To those people, Schildwachter says, "There's a trade-off here. There may be a small Btu variance in the product, but it's cleaner. In our own experience, we have 30 diesel fuel delivery trucks, one of the heaver vehicles, and it's had no problem with demission of power. And

Europe has been using this fuel for years."

One other company, Abbott & Mills in New Jersey, has offered a B20 BioFuel blend for the past three years. Schildwachter said their product has been well received.

The company's 5 million gallon terminal in Bronx has possibly the best location for a fuel distributor. It's near Interstate 95, which runs north and south along the East Coast; the Whitestone Bridge and Frog's Neck Bridge, which give passage to Queens; and the George Washington Bridge that connects to New Jersey.

Fred M. Schildwachter & Sons began offering biodiesel fuel blends in November 2002 and sells approximately 2 mmgy of the soybean-based renewable fuel. World Energy supplies B100 to the company, and then ironically buys back a blended product through its various contracts with fleets like the U.S. Postal Service.

Look for full-page advertising from Fred M. Schildwachter & Sons in the February issues of Newsweek, Time, U.S. World and News
 
 
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